Powerlifting

 

Powerlifting at Performance Fitness Gym Eastbourne  – Give it a try!

powerlifting team

Performance Fitness Powerlifting Team 2015

scott lifting

Scott Halliday Lifting

After an amazing European powerlifting championship right here in our own town, we are looking for new people to add to our ever growing team, so if you think you have what it takes, and would like to become part of the powerlifting team then please contact me. This is open to guys and girls of all sizes and ages,so there’s a place for everyone. Remember the British championship is in November!!!

Some information about Powerlifting below but why nor turn up at the gym and see what it is all about! Powerlifting is popular with both males and females these days.

Powerlifting is a strength sport that consists of three attempts at maximal weight on three lifts: squat, bench press, and deadlift. As in the sport of Olympic weightlifting, it involves lifting weights in three attempts.

Powerlifting evolved from a sport known as “odd lifts”, which followed the same three-attempt format but used a wider variety of events, akin to strongman competition. Eventually odd lifts became standardized to the current three.

In competition, lifts may be performed equipped or un-equipped (typically referred to as ‘raw’ lifting or ‘classic’ in the IPF specifically). Equipment in this context refers to a supportive bench shirt or squat/deadlift suit or briefs. In some federations, knee wraps are permitted in the equipped but not un-equipped division; in others, they may be used in both equipped and un-equipped lifting. Weight belts, knee sleeves, wrist wraps and special footwear may also be used, but are not considered when distinguishing equipped from un-equipped lifting.

Powerlifting Competitions

The squat, bench press and deadlift are the three main lifts in competition.

In order to maximize their effectiveness at these lifts, individuals typically train with a cyclical routine. A common split is to give each of the three lifts a day where exercises designed to increase that lift are performed or to treat the deadlift and squat as one lift and perform upper and lower body sessions, however there are many different methods. Training consists of mostly compound lifts (a compound lift being any movement across multiple joints) in the 1-5 repetition range.

Using a lower repetition range allows for the use of a higher weight and higher maximum force development. This occurs because usage of a higher weight (80-100% of maximum) will ensure that the limitation of weight lifted is limited by neural efficiency (how many muscle fibres the nervous system can trigger), rather than by exhaustion of the muscle fibres in the area. Higher reps in the 6-12 range are used for hypertrophy (size building/bodybuilding) and the 12-20+ range is typically used more for endurance athletes. It is not necessary to train for size or endurance because neither matter in a competition.

Powerlifting Rules of Performance

Squat

  • The lifter shall face the front of the platform. The bar shall be held horizontal across the shoulders, hands and fingers gripping the bar, and the top of the bar not more than the thickness of the bar below the outer edge of the shoulders. The hands may be positioned anywhere on the bar inside and/or in contact with the inner collars. The bar must not move more than its thickness from the lifter’s chosen starting position.
  • After removing the bar from the racks (the lifter may be aided in removal of the bar from the rack by the spotter/loaders) the lifter must move backwards to establish a starting position. When this lifter is motionless, erect with knees locked, and the bar properly positioned the Chief referee will give the signal to begin the lift. The signal shall consist of a downward movement of the arm together with the audible command “squat” the lifter may take any position adjustments within the rules, without penalty. for reasons of safety the lifter will be requested to “replace the bar” together with a backward movement of the arm, if after a period of five seconds he is not in the correct position to begin the lift.
  • Upon receiving the Chief Referee’s signal, the lifter must bend the knees and lower the body until the top surface of the of the legs at the hip joint is lower than the top of the knees. Only one decent attempt is allowed. The attempt is deemed to have commenced when the lifters knees have unlocked. The bar may move from its starting position downwards on the lifters back the thickness/diameter of the bar during the performance of the lift.
  • The lifter must recover at will to an upright position with the knees locked. Double bouncing at the bottom of the squat attempt or any downward movement is not permitted. When the lifter is motionless (in the apparent final position) the Chief Referee will give the signal to rack the bar.
  • The signal to rack the bar will consist of a backward motion of the arm and the audible command “rack”. The lifter must then move forward and return the bar to the racks. For reasons of safety the lifter may request the aid of the spotter/loaders in returning the bar to and replacing it in the racks. The lifter must stay with the bar during this process.
  • Not more than five and not less than two spotter/loaders shall be on the platform at anytime. The referees may decide to the number of spotter/loaders required on the platform at any time, 2,3,4 or 5

Causes for disqualification of a squat

  • Failure to observe the Chief referee’s signal at the commencement or completion of a lift.
  • Double bouncing at the bottom of a lift or any downward movement during the ascent.
  • Failure to assume an upright position with the knees locked at the commencement or completion of a lift.
  • Any excessive movement of the feet, although minor foot movement is allowed. Minor movement will be defined as slight lateral movement, or toes and/ heels coming up up off the platform. The toes and heels must return to the original position.
  • Failure to bend the knees and lower the body until the top surface of the legs at the hip joint are lower than the top of the knees.
  • Any movement of the bar on the back more than the diameter/thickness of the bar below its starting position
  • Contact with the bar or the lifter by the spotter/loaders between the Chief referee’s signals in order to make the lift easier.
  • Contact of the elbows or upper arms with the legs, slight contact is permitted if there is no supporting that might aid the lifter.
  • Any dropping or dumping of the bar after completion of the lift. Failure to comply with any of the items outlined under Rules of performance for the squat.

Bench Press

  • The bench shall be placed on the platform with the head facing the front or angled up to 45 degrees
  • The lifter must lie on his back with shoulders and buttocks in contact with the bench surface. The sole and heel of his shoes must be in contact with the floor or blocks. His hands and fingers must grip the bar positioned in the rack stands with thumbs around grip. This body position shall be maintained throughout the lift.
  • To achieve firm footing the lifter may use flat surfaced plates or blocks no exceeding 30cm in total height to build up the surface of the platform. Blocks in the range of 5cm, 10cm, 20cm 7 30cm should be made available for foot placement at all International competitions. Slight or very minor foot movement is allowed for both the platform and the blocks.
  • Not more than three and not less than two spotter/loaders shall be on the platform at any time. After correctly positioning himself, the lifter may enlist the help of the spotter/loaders in removing the bar from the racks. The lift off, if assisted by the spotter/loaders must be at arms length.
  • The spacing of the hands shall not exceed 81 cm measured between the forefingers (both forefingers must be within the 81cm marks). If in the case of some old injury or anatomically the lifter is unable to grip the bar equally with both hands he must inform the referees prior to lift off for each attempt and if necessary the bar will be marked accordingly. Use of the reverse grip is forbidden.
  • After removing the bar from the racks, with or without the help of the spotter/loaders, the lifter shall wait with elbows locked for the chief referee’s signal. The signal shall be given as soon as the lifter is motionless and the bar properly positioned. For reasons of safety the lifter will be requested to “replace” the bar, together with a backward movement of the arm, if after a period of five seconds he is not in the correct position to begin the lift.
  • The signal to begin the attempt shall consist of a downward movement of the arm together with the audible command “start”.
  • After receiving the signal, the lifter must lower the bar to the chest (the chest, for the purpose of the rule, finishes at the base of the sternum breastbone), hold it motionless on the chest, after which the Chief referee will signal the audible command “Press”. The lifter must then return the bar to arms length with no excessive / immoderate uneven extension of the arms. When held motionless in this position the audible command “Rack” shall be given together with a backward motion of the arm.
  • If anatomically the arms cannot be fully extended the lifter shall inform the referees prior to each attempt.

Causes for disqualification of a Bench press

  • Failure to observe the Chief referees signals at the commencement or completion of the lift.
  • Any change in the elected lifting position during the lift proper. i.e. any raising movement of the shoulders, buttocks from the bench or feet from the floor / blocks – plates or lateral movement of hands on the bar. Slight or very minor foot movement is allowed. Both sole and heel must stay in contact with the floor/blocks.
  • Heaving, bouncing or sinking the bar into the chest after it is motionless in such a way as to make the lift easier.
  • Any pronounced / exaggerated uneven extension of the arms during the lift.
  • Any downward movement of the bar in the course of being pressed out.
  • Failure to press the bar to full extension of the arms simultaneously at the completion of the lift.
  • Contact with the bar or the lifter by the spotter/loaders between the chief referees signal in order to make the lift easier.
  • Any contact of the lifter’s feet with the bench or its supports.
  • Deliberate contact between the bar and bar rest supports during the lift to make the lift easier.
  • Failure to comply with any of the items outlined under the Rules of Performance

Dead Lift

  • The lifter shall face the front of the platform with the bar laid horizontally in front of the lifter’s feet, gripped with an optional grip in both hands and lifted until the lifter is standing erect.
  • On completion of the lift the knees shall be locked in a straight position and the shoulders back.
  • The Chief Referee’s signal shall consist of a downward movement of the arm and the audible command “down”. The signal will not be given until the bar is motionless and the lifter is in the apparent finished position. If the bar is shaking when at the knee area, although not exactly pure, this is not a cause for failure.
  • Any raising of the bar or any deliberate attempt to do so will count as an attempt. Once the attempt has begun no downward movement is allowed until the lifter reaches the erect position with his knees locked. If the bar settles as the shoulders come back this should not be reason to disqualify the lift.

Causes for disqualification of a Dead Lift

  • Any downward movement of the bar before it reaches the final position.
  • Failure to stand erect with shoulders back.
  • Failure to lock the knees straight at the completion of the lift.
  • Supporting the bar on thighs during the performance of the lift. If the bar edges up the thighs but is not supported this is not reason for disqualification. The lifter should benefit in all decisions of doubt made by the referee.
  • Stepping backwards or forwards, although lateral movement of the foot or rocking feet between ball and heel is permitted.
  • Lowering the bar before receiving the Chief Referee’s signal.
  • Allowing the bar to return to the platform without maintaining control with both hands. i.e. releasing bar from palm of the hand.
  • Failure to comply with any of the items outlined under Rules of Performance.

 

For further information visit IPF at

 http://www.powerlifting-ipf.com/